A parent’s role in enhancing kids’ self-esteem

self-esteem-childrenParents” the word itself is so emotional and expressive. For a mother, God has given us the boon to feel a child all from inside and of course, after birth, with all our emotions and sentiments……it is our primary and wholesome duty to thank God by helping these masses of energy, our children grow up and be responsible citizens of the country. I am into a profession that actually deals with expressions, well I’m a scriptwriter, and my profession has made me get acquainted with many people, from different walks of life…… A lot of talking and sharing made me realize that parents of today feel that children are more smarter to take up hard work as they have to compete, and in turn from a very tender age they start over burdening the kids with not studies….which normally they can cope up with but the various co-curricular activities.

When we were small we knew this was one field which grew out of love of it but at present the concept has been given an absolute different definition… which is hardly helping the tender growing mind. They are not getting the space to grow….Besides a script writer I at times groom the little ones in the summer camps and I have seen the potential they have in them. Freedom has always helped them give out the best.

Motivation and encouragement has always made children grow free and not by pushing them to the crucial world of competition but by making them aware and gradually love the extra which we want them to learn. We are encircled with numerous diamonds and stars, all in its own natural form the only vital responsibility of the manufacturers are to carefully work on it! Polish them such that they are no less than the precious Kohinoor and be the sun’s powerful light source; so that we see a galaxy of reflecting stars, twinkle. The more burden the more anxiety which in turn demoralize these kids resulting in a very poor self esteem. Healthy self-esteem is a child’s armor against the challenges of the world. Kids who feel good about themselves seem to have an easier time handling conflicts and resisting negative pressures. They tend to smile more readily and enjoy life. These kids are realistic and generally optimistic. In contrast, kids with low self-esteem can find challenges to be sources of major anxiety and frustration. Those who think poorly of themselves have a hard time finding solutions to problems. If given to self-critical thoughts such as “I’m no good” or “I can’t do anything right,” they may become passive, withdrawn, or depressed. Faced with a new challenge, their immediate response is “I can’t.”
Here’s how you can play important role in promoting healthy self-esteem in your child.

What Is Self-Esteem?
Self-esteem can be defined as feelings of capability combined with feelings of being loved. A child who is happy with an achievement but does not feel loved may eventually experience low self-esteem. Likewise, a child who feels loved but is hesitant about his or her own abilities can also end up with low self-esteem. Healthy self-esteem comes when the right balance is reached.

How can a parent help to foster healthy self-esteem in a child? These tips can make a big difference:

  • Watch what you say. Kids are very sensitive to parents’ words. Remember to praise your child not only for a job well done, but also for effort. But be truthful. For example, if your child doesn’t make the school sports team, avoid saying something like, “Well, next time you’ll work harder and make it.” Instead, try “Well, you didn’t make the team, but I’m really proud of the effort you put into it.” Reward effort and completion instead of outcome.
  • Be a positive role model. If you’re excessively harsh on yourself, pessimistic, or unrealistic about your abilities and limitations, your child may eventually mirror you. Nurture your own self-esteem, and your child will have a great role model.
  • Identify and redirect your child’s inaccurate beliefs. It’s important for parents to identify kids’ irrational beliefs about themselves, whether they’re about perfection, attractiveness, ability, or anything else. Helping kids set more accurate standards and be more realistic in evaluating themselves will help them have a healthy self-concept. Inaccurate perceptions of self can take root and become reality to kids. For example, a child who does very well in school but struggles with math may say, “I can’t do math. I’m a bad student.” Not only is this a false generalization, it’s also a belief that will set the child up for failure. Encourage kids to see a situation in its true light. A helpful response might be: “You are a good student. You do great in school. Math is just a subject that you need to spend more time on. We’ll work on it together.”
  • Be spontaneous and affectionate. Your love will go a long way to boost your child’s self-esteem. Give hugs and tell kids you’re proud of them. Pop a note in your child’s lunchbox that reads, “I think you’re terrific!” Give praise frequently and honestly, without overdoing it. Kids can tell whether something comes from the heart.
  • Give positive, accurate feedback. Comments like “You can do it and you have the potential!” will make kids feel like they have no control over their outbursts. A better statement is, “You were really mad at your brother. But I appreciate that you didn’t yell at him or hit him.” This acknowledges a child’s feelings, rewards the choice made, and encourages the child to make the right choice again next time.
  • Create a safe, loving home environment. Kids who don’t feel safe or are abused at home will suffer immensely from low self-esteem. A child who is exposed to parents who fight and argue repeatedly may become depressed and withdrawn. Also watch for signs of abuse by others, problems in school, trouble with peers, and other factors that may affect kids’ self-esteem. Deal with these issues sensitively but swiftly. And always remember to respect your kids.
    Help kids become involved in constructive experiences. Activities that encourage cooperation rather than competition are especially helpful in fostering self-esteem. For example, mentoring programs in which an older child helps a younger one learn to read can do wonders for both kids.
  • It is important that you encourage your child. Just give a try it works.

We never know the love of our parents for us till we have become parents….Whatever gesture we choose to express our thanks, the important thing is that they know how much we love them…and Parents taught their kids, or shall I say Motivate kids to Move there lives in a certain direction.

Re-published with permission from the blog of ParentEdge, a bi-monthly parenting magazine that aims to expose parents to global trends in learning and partner with them in the intellectual enrichment of their children.