Newborn Care During Winters

Caring for babies

Those of you who are new parents will agree wholeheartedly that caring for babies is a daunting task in any season. Baby care is a specialized subject which requires 100% commitment from parents. If you have a support system consisting of doting grandparents, adoring aunts, fawning friends, dependable paediatricians and even the neighbour ladies who will drop in to care for the baby, you are one of those lucky people who will breeze through the initial months of baby care.

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What next moments

All parents face those moments of uncertainty when the baby just won’t stop crying. You have tried all known remedies. After spending yet another sleepless night nursing your baby, you make a resolve that you are going to be more careful in the future. Truth is no matter how hard the parents try, babies will fall sick. But one can take certain precautions during all seasons of the year to see that the instances of illness are infrequent and discomfort to the baby is minimal.

 

Common Winter Illnesses

Winter does bring some respite from the humid and sultry months, but it also brings its own set of challenges. As the baby’s immune system is still developing, they tend to be vulnerable to common cold and other winter illnesses like flu, viral fever, meningitis, pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Ear infections are very common in winter, and your baby can cry for hours without anyone being the wiser about what is causing your infant the discomfort.

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True Confessions Of A Stay At Home Mother

Every stay at home mother has a few confessions that she would rather keep to herself. But bring in anonymity and there are some surprising (and funny) revelations! We spoke to some to stay at home mothers to children of varying ages and came up with some gems that will have you smiling, if not rolling with laughter.

So, here goes!

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How to Treat Your Baby’s Cold

Baby ColdYour baby’s cold can be just as hard on you as it is on her.  But you can help ease your baby’s discomfort and keep the infection from worsening by ensuring she gets sufficient rest and liquids, which would include breast milk or formula if she’s less than four months old.  Older babies can have a little water, and by six months she can begin drinking juices.

To relieve congestion, try squeezing some over-the-counter saline solution drops into each nostril, then suctioning with a rubber bulb syringe after a few moments to remove the mucus and liquid.

This works well about fifteen minutes prior to a feeding if it’s difficult for your baby to breathe nasally while nursing. A bit of petroleum jelly to the outside of your baby’s nostrils can help reduce irritation.

Sitting with you in a steamy bathroom while the hot water’s on in the shower for about 15 minutes, or using a cool-mist vaporizer or humidifier to increase the moisture in your baby’s room should also help provide some relief for her.  A warm bath could also work, and might provide her some additional comfort.

Sleeping at a slight incline may also help relieve postnasal drip. However, don’t use pillows in her crib to accomplish this; the risk of suffocation is too great.  Try placing a couple of rolled up towels between the crib springs and mattress, or you might also want to try allowing her to sleep in her car seat in a slightly upright position.

Be sure to contact your pediatrician at the first sign of any illness in an infant less than three months old, especially in instances of a fever of 100.4 degrees or if she has a cough.  Your pediatrician can give you guidelines about what constitutes a fever in older infants.  If baby’s symptoms don’t improve within five to seven days, her cough worsens, she’s wheezing or gasping (possible pneumonia or respiratory syncytial virus, or RSV), or tugs at her ear (possible ear infection), your pediatrician should also be notified immediately.

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