How To Help your Child Kick the Thumb Sucking Habit

How To Help your Child Kick the Thumb Sucking HabitThumb sucking is a concern many parents have. Toddlers suck their thumbs because it’s comforting and calming. It’s probably something they did before they were born and revert back to it when they are nervous, agitated, scared or ill. . They may also use it to lull themselves back to sleep in the middle of the night.

Parents shouldn’t concern themselves unless it continues after the age their permanent teeth begin to appear, around six years old. Experts say that it’s the intensity of the thumb sucking and the tongue’s thrust that deforms teeth and makes braces necessary later. Children who rest their thumb passively in their mouth are less likely to have difficulty than children who suck aggressively. If you’re concerned, closely monitor your child and analyze his technique. If they appears to be sucking vigorously, you may want to begin curbing their habit earlier.

Punishing or nagging your child to stop won’t help because it’s usually an automatic response. Attempting to curb it by putting an elastic bandage on his thumb or another method will seem like unjust punishment, especially since they indulge in the habit for comfort and security.

Try to wait it out. Children usually give up thumb-sucking when they’ve found other ways to calm and comfort themselves. my ip . Consider offering them other alternatives to comfort themselves such as a soft blanket or toy.

The key is to notice when and where they are likely to suck their thumbs and offer an alternative. If it happens while they are tired, try giving more naps. If they suck their thumb frequently while watching television, try to distract them with a toy that will keep their hands occupied.

Older children may need gentle reminders to curtail thumb sucking while in public, and praise should be given freely when the child finds and uses an acceptable alternative. Your child’s pediatric dentist can offer other suggestions for helping your child kick the thumb sucking habit.

26 Reasons Why You’ll Love Carrying The BrilSlate Everywhere You Go

So, let’s say you’re in the electronics section of a super market and playing around with the android tablets on display. The usual suspects: Samsung Galaxy Tab, Galaxy Note, Blackberry Playbook and Motorola Xoom.

Suddenly your friend jumps in front of you and whispers into your ear, “You gotta see this Tablet!” He seems extra quirky and that somewhat picks your interest.

But you’re thinking, “Oh boy… What can he show me that I haven’t seen already?”

Well…

Brace yourself, and read this article cause it’s a total game changer.

There’s a new Tablet in town called the BrilSlate – click on Reuters, DNA or Fox 5 News to read the articles and reviews.

I really liked the (free) elegant leather cover too… Samsung didn’t give any cover at all; we had to buy it for an additional Rs 2000.
~ Ramesh Sankaran

The BrilSlate is brought to you by the same company that has been making living fun since 1964. They started as an Ink Bottle, expanded into various product lines and now launched this totally amazing Tablet.

And guess what? It’s so affordable that you can actually:

Buy 2 BrilSlates for the Price of 1 Samsung Galaxy Tab.

You heard that right. It costs just Rs.10,999. But don’t let that sneaky price ever let you think that this little tablet isn’t a powerhouse! Did I say little? Keep reading. You’ll see.

The BrilSlate is a snazzy, high performance, Android 4.0 (ice cream sandwich) tablet with multi-point capacitive touch screen and an amazingly sleek metal casing! Great for school, home and office use. Surf the web, check and send emails, create and edit documents, download great apps from the Android Market, play games, listen to music, watch movies and more!

The BrilSlate is powered by the latest version of Android. This means you have complete access to over 500,000 games and apps that can be instantly downloaded.

Categories: Books & Reference, Business, Comics, Education, Entertainment, Finance, Health & Fitness, Libraries, Lifestyle, Medical, Music & Audio, News & Magazines, Photography, Productivity, Shopping, Transportation, Travel, Weather, and LOTS more.

Social Networking: (view all apps here)

FacebookTwitterGoogle PlusYouTubeLinkedIn

Games: (view all apps here)

Angry Birds Cut The RopeRacing Moto SuperbikeIPL Cricket T20 FeverPool Master Pro

Finance: (view all apps here)

State Bank of IndiaICICI Mobile Banking - iMobileCitibank IndiaAxis MobileMoneycontrol Markets on Mobile

Health & Fitness: (view all apps here)

WebMD for AndroidFat Melting AbsInstant Heart RateNike+ RunningVirtuaGym Fitness Home & Gym

Shopping: (view all apps here)

Official eBay Android AppFlipkartSnapdealAmazon MobileBarcode Scanner

Phew! 500,000 apps and growing every day.

This Tablet surprisingly is really quick to load. The BlackBerry Playbook takes HOURS to load! The USB, SD Card and HDMI options are a boon as even many of the bigger brands don’t have it.
~ Ramesh Sankaran, owner of a Samsung Galaxy Tab, BlackBerry Playbook and BrilSlate

The BrilSlate was created just for you to organize your life, recapture joyful moments with your family and friends, have a blast, and make living fun.

With that, I’ll leave you with:

25 Reasons Why You’ll Love Carrying The
BrilSlate Everywhere You Go:

    1. Ultra-sleek design with a snazzy silver-metal back casing
    2. Operating system: Android 4.0 (ice cream sandwich)
    3. Rockchip 2918 chip solution, main frequency: 1.2GHz
    4. Amazing high-performance 7.0″ Capacitive touch screen with 5-points touch
    5. Dimensions: 192(L) X 118(W) X 12.3(H) mm- exceptional Ultra-thin design
    6. Crystal-clear screen with high-resolution 800*480 pixels for enhanced viewing experience
    7. Built-in flash memory of 8GB extendable up to 32 GB using a SD Card
    8. Built-in 512MB DDR2 RAM for seamless, high-speed performance
    9. Supports WIFI 802.11 b/g/n for a great wireless internet experience
    10. Supports external 3G data card/dongle^
    11. Supports HDMI function
    12. Supports G-talk, MSN, QQ, Skype and other popular software for voice, video# and text based communication
    13. Supports EMAIL and internet with android browsers
    14. Supports a wide range of e-book formats
    15. Music formats supported: MP3/WMA/APE/FLAC/AAC/OGG/AC3/WAV and more!
    16. Video formats: Max.1280*720 MKV(H.264 HP) /AVI / RM / RMVB / FLV / WMV9 / MP4 and more!
    17. Picture formats: High resolution JPEG/BMP/GIF/PNG and more.
    18. One high-clarity speaker built-in
    19. 0.3M pixel front camera built-in
    20. G-sensor function built-in for screen rotation
    21. Powered by a 4500Mah rechargeable lithium battery with Working life: Up to 6 hours**
    22. Charger: 110-240V, 50-60HZ
    23. Access to great apps on Google Android Market!
    24. Includes: HDMI Cable, Earphone and User Manual
    25. Built-in USB Port
    26. A free high-end leather case included to further accentuate your BrilSlate experience.

I’m particularly impressed with its video playback- What clarity! It’s truly a pleasure using the BrilSlate for movies!
~Sakthivel

For more information about the BrilSlate, CLICK HERE.

BrilSlate can be purchased online on www.brilindia.com.

Productive and Positive Potty Training

Your child’s showing all the signs of being ready to potty train. That’s great! But now, where do you start?

Explain to your toddler that going potty is a normal process of life and everyone does it, even animals. Talk with them about the toilet, a special place where they can potty just like the big kids. Tell him how the potty works and let him try flushing himself. Explain that they will be wearing underwear and not diapers. Find some educational and entertaining videos of their favorite characters learning to go potty. Be sure to involve other family members in the process and emphasize the importance of consistency during this process.

Make a special trip to the store and purchase new underwear with your toddler. Let them have a voice in what you get. The underwear will have much more significance if your toddler helped choose them.

Overalls, pants with lots of buttons, snaps or zips, tight or restrictive clothing and oversized shirts will all be an obstacle to your child during this process. Put these kinds of clothes away for the time being.

Decide whether or not you’re going to use pull-ups, training pants or regular underwear and try to stick with this decision so your child has consistency and isn’t confused. Think about whether or not you want to use rewards or not. Figure out a strategy on how to handle potty issues when you’re away from home.

If your child is in child care, ask your provider for their advice and make sure there aren’t any hard and fast rules the center or caregiver has in place that may be an issue. Let them know that you’re going to start and enlist their help with the process.

Praise your child for each successful trip to the potty, and comfort them when accidents happen and try to remain patient and calm when they do. Avoid using candy or other treats as reinforcement. Let them know that it will take a while to get the hang of using the potty, and encourage and praise each attempt they make. With consistency, encouragement and praise, they’ll soon be completely trained.

The Family that Eats Together Stays Healthy Together

The Family that Eats Together Stays Healthy TogetherRecent studies have shown that not only do children like to sit down at the dinner table and eat a meal with their parents, but they are more likely to eat a well-balanced, nutritious meal when they do.

But with the hectic lives we seem to lead these days, getting the family all together in the same place at the same time can be a difficult chore. Between work schedules, after-school activities, errands, and the like, it seems we have less and less time. But with a few simple ideas and some planning, meal time can be an enjoyable and treasured family time.

Designate no less than one night per week to have a sit-down meal with your family. Sunday nights are usually a good choice for this because you have more time to relax and the weekend chores have been completed.

Involve your children in the meal planning and preparation. This gives them a strong sense of self and the foundation for a lifetime of healthy meal planning and preparation.

Make sure the television is off, and make it a rule that all phone calls go to voice mail or the answering machine during the meal. Take this time to visit with one another and enjoy one another’s company. This is a great time to reconnect and find out what events happened this week. Take your time eating, and teach your children how to do the same in the process. domain owner search Eating slowly is a healthy habit. Don’t jump up and start clearing dishes and putting things away until everyone is done eating and talking.

On those days that you can’t sit down as a family, try to make a habit of sitting down and chatting with them while they are eating, instead of rushing around catching up on the chores. This shows them you’re interested and that you care and want to be and involved and important part of their every day life.

Photo Credits: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Teach your Child to Give Respect and They’ll Gain Respect in Return

Teach your Child to Give Respect and They'll Gain Respect in Return  One of the most important things you can teach your child is respect and the best way to teach respect is to show respect. When a child experiences respect, they know what it feels like and begin to understand how important it is.

Keep in mind the saying “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

Respect is an attitude. Being respectful helps a child succeed in life. If children don’t have respect for peers, authority, or themselves, it’s almost impossible for them to succeed. A respectful child takes care of belongings and responsibilities, and a respectful child gets along with peers.

Schools teach children about respect, but parents have the most influence on how respectful children become. Until children show respect at home, it’s unlikely they will show it anywhere else.

How can you show respect to your child? If you do something wrong, admit it and apologize. Don’t embarrass, insult or make fun of your child. domain technical info . Compliment them and let your child make choices and take responsibility. Listen to your child’s side of the story before making a decision on an issue or problem. Be polite and use “please” and “thank you” when asking them to do things. Knock before entering your child’s room. Keep promises. Show your child that you mean what you say. And give your child your full attention.

And most important, teach your children that respect is earned. Make sure that you are leading by example and modeling respectful behavior. Be a law-abiding citizen. Show concern for your environment, animals and other people. Openly and honestly discuss exampled of witnessed disrespect.

In addition, teach your child to respect themselves. Self-respect is one of the most important forms of respect. Once we respect ourselves, it is easier to respect others.
Help them set and achieve goals. Encourage honesty and teach them that people make mistakes, and that they are the best way to learn.

Most importantly, praise your child often for good deeds, behaviors or traits, and tell them you love them at least several times each day. You’re sure to raise a child capable of giving and gaining respect.

 

Photo credits: freedigitalphotos

Hobbies are Healthy

Hobbies are HealthyHobbies benefit children in many ways. It gives a child an opportunity to express themselves, and it allows them to discover themselves and build self-esteem. They are also great educational tools. A child interested in rock collecting learns about geology and science, and a child in writing stories learns about sentence structure and proper grammar. Hobbies teach children to set and achieve goals, solve problems and make decisions. They can also set the course for what your child becomes later in life as they often turn into lifelong interests or careers.

Children who have hobbies are usually following in their parents footsteps, so set a good example by pursuing your own hobby. Your child will need space for their hobby, so find an area designated specifically for his hobby so he can work on it. Realize that hobbies can sometimes be quite messy, so be at the ready for messes as they come with the territory.

Be available to your child to provide guidance, support and encouragement. This is a great time to teach your child strong work habits, such as following directions closely, setting goals, and proper planning and organization. Show them that nothing worthwhile is ever easy, especially when they begin to become frustrated with their progress. It’s also a good time to teach them about personal responsibility and show them how important it is to properly care for their work area and their ‘tools of the trade.’

Children will be more encouraged to work on their hobbies if activities like watching television or playing video games are limited. It’s been noted by experts that by age 15, the average child has spent more time watching television than sitting in a classroom. Again, here’s where setting a good example is crucial. Instead of watching that four-hour football game on Saturday, turn the TV off and work on your own hobby. is site down . Your child may want to join in or work on their own as a result.

Hobbies are rewarding and enriching parts of our lives, so encourage your child to explore his own interests and find a hobby of their very own.

Photograph credits: FreeDigitalPhotos

Expect Only the Best from Your Child

Expect Only the Best from Your ChildExpect the best from your child. If you expect the best behavior and performance  from your child, it’s often what you will get. similar sites . Children pick up on our beliefs about them, form a self-concept that matches that belief, and perform accordingly.

If we expect them to be lazy, they’ll be lazy, which will confirm our expectations for them, and the cycle toward failure is started.

If, on the other hand, we expect our kids to be successful, productive, creative, and responsible and honestly believe it to be true, then our children can’t help but rise to the occasion and confirm our best opinions of them with their positive actions. So expect nothing but the best from your children and watch them fulfill your expectations.

Praise your child often when they perform a good deed or accomplish a new task. Set simple, clear and consistent rules so your child knows exactly what is expected and the consequences of misbehaving or breaking the rules.

Maintain a consistent daily routine for your child as much as possible, and make sure your child gets lots of physical activity and time to play and socialize with their friends. Encourage your child to learn how to make appropriate choices, and encourage your child to do things for themselves. Allow your child to talk about strong feelings, which will help them work through their anger and frustration.

Above all, be a positive role model for your child, as their strongest educator is your example. Take care of yourself, and expect the best from yourself. Make appropriate choices and be firm yet fair when disciplining your child. Make sure to spend lots of quality time with your child, and encourage them to become involved in activities that foster cooperation and a sense of accomplishment. If you have great expectations of your child, you’ll be greatly pleased in the end.

Photograph credits: http://www.freedigitalphotos.net

Tactics for Tackling a Toddler’s Temper Tantrum

Tactics for Tackling a Toddler’s Temper Tantrum - BrilEven the best behaved toddler has an occasional temper tantrum. A tantrum can range from whining and crying to screaming, kicking, hitting, and breath holding. They’re equally common in boys and girls and usually occur from age 1 to age 3. Some children may experience regular tantrums, whereas for other children, tantrums may be rare. Some kids are more prone to throwing a temper tantrum than others.

Toddlers are trying to master the world and when they aren’t able to accomplish a task, they often use one of the only tools at their disposal for venting frustration – a tantrum. There are several basic causes of tantrums that are familiar to parents everywhere: The child is seeking attention or is tired, hungry, or uncomfortable. In addition, tantrums are often the result of children’s frustration with the world. Frustration is an unavoidable part of kids’ lives as they learn how people, objects, and their own bodies work.

Tantrums are common during the second year of life, a time when children are acquiring language. Toddlers generally understand more than they can express. As language skills improve, tantrums tend to decrease.

Keep off-limits objects out of sight and out of reach, which will make struggles less likely to develop over them. Distract your child. Take advantage of your little one’s short attention span by offering a replacement for the coveted object or beginning a new activity to replace the frustrating or forbidden one. And choose your battles: consider the request carefully when your child wants something. Is it outrageous? Maybe it isn’t. . Accommodate when possible to avoid an outburst.

Make sure your child isn’t acting up simply because he or she isn’t getting enough attention. To a child, negative attention (a parent’s response to a tantrum) is better than no attention at all. Try to establish a habit of catching your child being good (“time in”), which means rewarding your little one with attention and praise for positive behavior. This will teach them that acting appropriately makes mommy and daddy happy and proud, and they’ll be anxious to do it again and again.

Photo credits: freedigitalphotos

Do As I Say and As I Do

Children learn to imitate at a very young age.  It’s how they learn to behave, care for themselves, develop new skills, and communicate with others. From their earliest moments they watch you closely and pattern their own behavior and beliefs after yours. Your examples become permanent images, which will shape their attitudes and actions for the rest of their life.

It’s important to be responsible, consistent and loving with your child.  This also holds true for the relationship you have with your spouse, your parents, and other family members and friends that are also a part of your child’s life.  Own up to mistakes when you make them, and communicate open and honestly with all family members.

It’s also important to take good care of yourself.  When we’re focusing on what’s best for our child it’s easy to neglect our own needs.  Your child and your family are counting on you physically and emotionally, so it’s imperative that you teach your child by example that taking care of yourself helps you to take care of them and the rest of your family.  This shows your child that not only do you love them and the rest of the family, but you love yourself as well.  This is an important step in teaching your child about self esteem.  This may involve getting a sitter and treating yourself out to dinner and a movie, or doing another favorite activity on your own.  This teaches your child that you are not only their parent, but your own person with your interests and needs, and also gives them a chance to show you how well they can do without you with them for a while.

It’s also important to nurture your relationship with your spouse.  Let your child see you communicate in a positive and healthy manner with one another, and show love and affection for one another so your child can begin to learn early on what a healthy marriage should be like.

You’ll soon see your child patterning many of his behaviors after your own.  So make sure that what you say and do around your child will help build a strong sense of security and self esteem.

Photo credits: freedigitalphotos

Chart your Child’s Accomplishments with a Chore Chart

It can be very frustrating to ask your child over and over again to complete their chores without them ever getting done. If this describes your house to a tee, consider designing a chore chart.

Chores might include taking out the garbage, doing the dishes, cleaning their room, yard work or putting laundry in the laundry room. Each chore has to be done just once or twice a week. Anything more is unrealistic. After your child completes each chore, they can put a check mark on the chore chart. At the end of each week, it’s very inspiring for both parent and child to look at the chore chart and easily see that each designated job was completed. Just like our ‘to do’ lists, your child will find great satisfaction in being able to check off each chore as it’s completed and take pride knowing they accomplished a set task or list of tasks.

Once you’ve sat down with your child and discussed and designed a chore chart, it’s time to discuss the rewards for accomplishing each task listed. Perhaps at your home you decide you will give a set sum for each task accomplished. If you should decide to grant your child some sort of monetary allowance, make sure it’s age appropriate and granted on a regular basis.

This is a great opportunity for you to teach your children the value of both earning and saving money, and also giving back. Perhaps the child can divide their allowance into thirds: 1/3 to spend, 1/3 to save, and 1/3 to use to help those less fortunate than themselves. You might also want to consider designing a ‘bank book’ for each portion of the allowance and tuck each into three separate coffee cans or money jars, and that way you and your child will be able to keep track of how much has been saved, how much has been spent, and how much of their allowance has gone to help someone else.

Should you decide to use non-monetary incentives as chores payment, be sure you set clear parameters for your child. Be sure they understand that two hours each weekend of their favorite video game or going to see a movie with mom or dad is only earned by completing the chore list successfully each week. server hosting ip You might want to consider writing these on a slip of paper as ‘currency’ for the child to keep in their ‘privilege bank’ and they can cash it in with you when they’d like.

Regardless of the method you choose, keep in mind this can be a valuable tool for both you and your child.